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degree was running its own foreign policy. one of the big things we're looking to understand about ping's government over the next year or two is whether he can bring the pla under his control. he's already been head of the military commission which is really the most powerful role there. it took hu jintao a few years before he got named to that post. >> rose: david sanger thank you as always. >> thank you, charlie. >> we look at politics the republican and democratic party. the republican national committee comes in the way of political conference where republican leaders met to discuss the future of their party. report contained an endorsement of comprehensive immigration reform and extensive discussion of social issues. the gop has struggled to define itself since the loss in the 2012 presidential election. joining me to help me understand this from washington al lent fr boomberg view andark halperin from "time" magazine. i'm pleased to have both of them back on this program. i begin with this al. as you know i've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there ge
? >> you have a great number of things. stories about the economy and about the foreign policy cash, etc.. what prompted me to write spin masters though was the benghazi attack. it became clear that the political news media rather than focusing on a story of foreign policy failures and the president had promised fy failing to produce eight said it significantly destroyed al qaeda and here we see the terrorists acting out. romney didn't feel that situation that well with his press conference he called it at the wrong time about the guy that runs the entire foreign policy apparatus in the united states. it really does seem he used to say that a reporter is someone else that will sell his soul for a good story but it took turns out when the story might make barack obama look bad or make his presidency looks like a failure they are going to miss stories by definition simply for the inability to see the failure to be interested .... on the editorial page recovered the way that i wanted to be covered if i have anyone to blame but myself. we are part of who we are as the washington examiner but
. and susan glasser, executive editor of "foreign policy" magazine. it seems as john kerry hop scotchs around the region, all he is encountering are rocks and hard places. am i right? >> yes, you are right about that. i mean, this is a region i think that actually has been crying out for a bit more u.s. engagement, but that doesn't mean that it's going to be easy. the secretary kerry clearly shows he's ready to be engaged but, you know, he's walking into a situation in iraq where the united states has already withdrawn its troops in afghanistan where we're in the process, and that means we are diminishing influence in both of those places. we still have interests there but diminishing influence. syria, a very, very hot conflict. the united states has been reluctant to get more involved, and then... and iran, of course, difficult negotiations with, you know, not necessarily any sign of progress. and then on top of all of that, secretary kerry has shown that he wants to take on the israeli-palestinian issue and see if he can make progress where others have not. >> ifill: what does his schedule,
neighbor. xi jinping's neighbor shares a border with russia. common views on foreign policy and thriving trade ties. it's the first stop on the chinese president's nine-day diplomatic tour. xi jinping arrived in moscow to an official welcoming. his wife accompanied him. she's a well-known military singer. president xi is scheduled to hold a news conference on friday evening after meeting russian president vladimir putin. during his three-day stay, he will visit the russian defense ministry and will meet students learning the chinese language. president xi will then fly to africa. he's visiting tanzania and the republic of congo. he'll also attend a summit in south africa of five emerging economies known as brics. brazil, russia, india, china and south africa. >>> russia has turned down an appeal for aid by cyprus leaving banks on the island country in deep financial trouble. cyprus sent its finance minister michael air isous to moscow to seek help from russia. many wealthy companies and people keep their money in russia because of preferential tax treatment. two days of talks ended up wi
fundamental, important foreign policy issues that you do not do at 3:00 o'clock in the morning and change the dynamics of the middle east, change the dynamics of our national security and interest. >> but is this business as usual from now on in washington? coming up, we will dissect what some are calling a, quote, carnival stage of the u.s. government. rick? >> all right. from the carnival to the weather. spring is here officially. but for millions of americans, it feels more like winter is not going away. the snow continues to fall in parts of colorado. it's part of the storm in the midwest. it could drop a foot of snow in some areas. and this storm system is on the move. it could create some serious travel problems all the way to those of us here in the northeast. meteorologist janis dean live with more. >> it's nice to see you. i'm sorry i'm delivering the bad news. >> that's okay. >> for a lot of folks, unfortunately. millions of people could be seeing another winter storm. let's take a look at it. there is our satellite imagery. heavy snow into kansas city. a warm side of the storm
that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming mow desperate. the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. there's no secret that they are there. i think the probabilities are very high that we are going into some very dark times and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification but given everything we know over t
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he had two brothers who died of tuberculosis so there wasn't very good health care. one brother was 7-years-old, six or seven and then his older brother died when he was 25 and so she was -- so he was very much an internationalist and nixon was a big supporter of the marshall plan and voted for it and a lot of his sestak e
: julie senator graham says this is quote, an exhibit a of a failed foreign policy and this is why the president allegedly doesn't want the people to come forward. bin laden is on the run, and al-qaeda is alive and well and benghazi, and how the people were allegedly begging for help. and we know that about the ambassador and apparently these people would back up-- >> and senator graham has to create the anti-obama to-- that's not what it's about at all. >> i would caution you and say this, senator graham can allege what it wants and white house can allege what it wants. the more lessons drawn from this the better. the more testimony from congress is the better. and if it's done privately without jeopardizing the covert operatives i'm for it. instead of trotting out on the sunday talk shows where senator graham is trying to burnish his bona fides, as opposed to going out there and-- >> how much more can he do? >> he can't prove this? >> senator graham is a whistle blower. >> he can't proof anything. >> he's to get what he's entitled to. the president doesn't seem to honor or respec
been boors, the director of foreign policy at the brookings. the president going around the government and right to the young people of israel. >> it was an amazing speech he game yesterday in jerusalem, in which he spoke to 2,000 young israelis about the importance of israel to the united states, and made a very clear statement that israel would never be -- he explained his commitment to israeli security but went on to make an impassioned play for peacemaking and around the leadership in israel to say to the young people, it's time for you to push your leadership to take risks. >> this is a man with a 10% approval rating, which i'm guessing just went up. but at the same time, these israelis are dealing with harsh realities of walls on every border, an impossible long-term situation, and a realizeways that without peace, long term, not good. >> that's exactly the argument. then he went on to do something today which was somewhat of a breakthrough in terms of relations between turkey and israel. he managed to broker an apology from prime minister benjamin netanyahu to the prime minister
beginning that barack obama's the most controlling foreign policy president since richard nixon. hillary clinton was given very true truly cons quential issues to manage. kerry may be in a better situation because it's legacy time and obama is trying to figure out what do todo on the domestic side. he might turn john kerry, who is quite capable, into a manager in chief on the israeli/palestinian issue. >> jamie: let me focus on that. what is realistic, aaron? the palestinians want settlement building to stop. benjamin netanyahu says no. can we ever get them to the table with preconditions? >> no, not with preconditions. i think the president really dodged the one headache he created for himself in the first term, when was to demand a comprehensive settlement freeze, which no israeli prime minister would agree. to so i think you will not see a resumption of formal negotiations. you will see quiet contacts between the israelis and palestinians and a lot of frequent flyer miles for john kerry, having separate conversations with the israelis and the palestinians to see whether or not there i
. >> glenn green wells wold, thanks for coming on the program. >> the 10th average of the biggest foreign policy disaster since the vietnam war the start of the iraq invasion and occupation. since we know how it turned out no surprise that some of the media figures and poll advertises and reporters who hyped the war in 2003 actually apologized for making that mistake, if not necessarily for the thousands of americans and tens of thousands of iraqis who died. and then, there's the washington post. the editorial page beat the war drums loudly before, during and after the war began. in 2004, the post's media are the oar counted more than 140 stories the paper ran before the war that gave the bush administration's party line on the front page while burying any objections inside around page 18. now, that may sound like a fail u. to you it does to me. after the post commissioned a piece by writer greg mitchell about media failures, it clearly had second thoughts about putting that in print. for more, i'm delighted to be joined by greg mitchell. greg, thank you so much for joining us. >> thank y
accomplish? journalists and foreign policy expert a fellow at the institute of peace and wood row wilson international center joins us to talk about a few things we learned from the president's trip. first of all, you say it changed the diplomatic climate of the middle east. is that a little too optimistic? and how so? >> well, the most important thing to come out of this trip was the deal between turkey and israel. turkey is the most powerful muslim country of the 57 nations with strong muslim populations. and this makes a lot of other things possible, whether it's cooperation on syria, whether it gives the blessing to the islamic world dealings with israel, which is widely viewed as kind of an outpost of the west. so it changes the atmosphere in a lot of ways. >> robin, we always talk about the red line if you will when it comes to dealing with iran. it seemed as if at least in this trip the president successfully turned down the volume a little bit in trying to get on the same page with israel and that red line. >> well, this has been the biggest point of tension between president oba
and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key point here. their constituents wants them to focus on
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
armed services committee. chairman carl levin, democrat of michigan told foreign policy.com's josh rogan he wants to see the u.s. help establish a no-fly zone over syria. lindsey graham republican senator from south carolina called for u.s. boots on the ground. quote we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapon sites either in conjunction with our partners or if nothing else by ourselves. graham told josh rogan. you have got to get on the ground. i don't care what it takes. the white house held firm today saying its policy for now is that it will not be providing any lethal aid to the rebels. shep? >> shepard: james rosen at the white house tonight. well, a mixed day on wall street as investors around the world obviously eyed the island nation of cyprus where lawmakers rejected a controversial plan to qualify for a bailout. the dow made up for early losses and closed up but just four points. the nasdaq fell 8 the s&p off close to four. meantime markets in europe dropped over fears that the government of cyprus would tap into people's savings accounts. just reach in and get money
and trade agreements with india and japan and the united states are part of the foreign policy and building those competitive -- in the world. and we can provide the economy with the infrastructure that it needs. investment largest in railways cents victorian times and spending more onerous than in a generation. and the treasury is now writing guarantees for major projects from the old power station site to build a new power station of tomorrow. we switched billions of pounds from current capital spending, to mitigate the sharp decline set in by the last government. stillpital spending is due to fall back in 2015-2016 and i don't think that this is sensible, and by using the extra savings, we will list the infrastructure by 3 billion --nds per year, with filth 15 billion of extra capital spending over the next decade, to invest in the economic arteries of this country to get growth slowing to every part of this. deputy speaker, public investment will now be higher on average as a percentage of the national income under our plan that was in the last labor government. out long- will set term
it all up, it's probably $2 trillion to $3 trillion of american costs, distorted american foreign policy. the idea that we took so much of our situation after the end of the cold war and we devoted it to iraq given everything else we could've, should've done. historians will scratch their head and say why did the united states get so distracted and distorted -- >> and stayed there after we knew there weren't weapons. >> and that's the big lesson we should draw from this in afghanistan. we've got to respect local realities. united states cannot go around the middle east and remake it in our liking. we've got to have a degree of humility about the limits of our influence. and you asked whether we learned the lessons. with vietnam, iraq and afghanistan, i hope we've learnlearn ed. >> and iraq and afghanistan. first of all, be far, far more skeptical than most of us were going in to iraq. also, no matter how far you are down the path, if it's the wrong path, turn around. and we should've done that. i want to read what you talked about the human cost. mike barnicle e-mailed me this last night
magazine, he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls and e-mails and tweets. each morning at seven eastern on c-span. >> 70,000 people have died since the protest of bashar al-assad and syria. there was a hearing on thursday. live coverage starts at 9:45 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> 34 years ago today, we began providing televised access to the everyday workings of congress and the federal government. the c-span networks were created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you you as a public service by your television provider. >> edward demarco, the director of the federal housing finance agency testified on tuesday on the state of the housing market. and the future of fannie mae and freddie mac. this is two hours and 40 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> the committee will come to order it without objection. the chair has authorized recess of the committee. at any time, the chair recognizes himself for two minutes for an opening statement. i would like to start off quoting from our witnesses testimony. few of us can imagine i
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
at this podium and talk about foreign policy issues but i'm glad to be here today to talk about this diplomatic campaign in pakistan and afghanistan. i want to say one of the good things about speaking to a washington audience, when jessica goes through the jobs you've had everyone goes uh-huh, uh-huh. >> i was somewhere speaking and someone said here is ambassador grossman. i want to say what a pleasure it is to see so many people here in the audience who i have had the great benefit of learning from for many years. without drawing any distinctions i hope you'll allow me three. i started my career in pakistan junior to 1979 as a officer and howy was a boss of mine. i see ambassador hugh sane as the first a foreign diplomat i ever had to meet and do business with. i'm glad to see you. simon henderson was a stringer for a number of very important pub bli indications then and he taught me a lot of about journalism. i know there are others this in this room as well. those three take me back to 1979.1978 and we'll see what you say when this is over. what i want to do stod take up the offer that i
foreign policy. each case is treated as an isolated situation. look at this itinerary, what he has planned there is not much to improve the relationship with the israeli government in a content level. martha: president obama has said we are not sort of this super power that we used to be in many ways. the world has changed, right? so there is an opportunity here to be a leader, in terms of israel. to go to israel, doug and say look nothing has changed in this relationship we are steadfast in our support of israel, which of course he has said but some people feel the meaning behind it hasn't been as forceful as in the past. >> i agree with you, martha, if he goes and does that and i fully expect he will, that is an important state. standing with our only stable democratic ally in the middle east is hugely important given the unrest in egypt and throughout the region. i think that clarifying positions on iran, the red line and what we're prepared to do and where we've prepared to do it is critically important. i'm glad he's willing to do that even if it's limited to just that. martha: look a
. it was a name juror foreign policy objective of the obama administration when he came in. special envoy grossman who took mr. holbrooke's place when he passed away had a principle mission to do that but those negotiations broke down because one, the karzai government was not involved, pakistan was not involved and the various influential groups inside afghanistan were also not involved. the fact that karzai is beginning the initiative i don't see anything wrong with that. i think it's the beginning of a very long process which is also troubled by the opposition that the factions have and the strong views. i mean people in afghanistan do not want the taliban to take control of any of the population inside of afghanistan after a negotiated settlement to be sure. jenna: you mentioned the factions though. it was interesting doing a little research for this segment i realize the state department does not list the taliban as a terrorist organization. there are different taliban-related groups, for example, a taliban, i want to call it a sector, a taliban group in pakistan that is listed as a terrorist
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
levin, chairman of the armed services committee, and u.s. defense and foreign policy. later a discussion on expanding coverage under the health care law for the lgbt community. >> president obama is set to arrive in israel on wednesday, followed by a was -- a visit to the west bank and a final stop in jordan, during his first overseas trip in his second term. two former middle east advisers discussed theouse president's trip. from the washington institute, this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. and welcome to the washington institute. i am the director of the institute. i'm very happy to welcome all of you today. just at the outside, if i could remind you, cell phone off please. not just on a vibrate. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. the event is being broadcast by c-span. -- say ng you can say can and will be used against you. we are gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term. east,going to the middle israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the i
areas of our government to do that. remember, a lot of what our defense budget is is foreign policy now. it's not defense. it's not war fighting. we're not using our men and women under arms to really protect us. look at our defense budget as a policy against bad guys. we're taking a lot of that insurance money and using it for other things, other things which are not going to help us if these bad guys come after us. >> brian: if the pentagon has their chance to cut, this is the type of stuff they will cut. >> they're not allowed to do that. this administration, with all their transparencies, not going to let us know where the money and how the money is being spent. >> brian: his book is called " shadow boxes." >> why to see you. >> brian: tv anchors are supposed to be ready for anything. but how do you get ready for this? >> we have break news to report. fox 54 has just learned a huntsville news anchor is being proposed on live -- right now. >> brian: wow. meet the anchor who got the surprise of her life on live television. on a serious note, the sequester is putting the usda workers o
is political advisor, he is not a foreign policy expert as least the last time i looked, and yet he is sending memos to the secretary of state on benghazi. let me say i don't think there is anything improper about that but certainly underlines the political nature of the administration's handling of the post-benghazi environment. and i can't wait to read these memos. i'm sure they will be a real treat. i think it will simply increase demands in congress for answers about the real facts of benghazi that after six months we still haven't gotten skbri mean, the thoughts on hacking, everybodies that -- everybody has their feeling how this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own co
of all, they don't like covering foreign policy stories anymore. most of the bureaus have shut down around the world. they rely on stringers. we've got a lot of propaganda coming into the american media, and i think that while the ten-year anniversary is important, it's more important for the media to look into the fact that this isn't just about nation-states or any one leader. this is about a virus, radical islam, that continues to threaten not only the middle east, but much of the rest of the world. that's the real story that needs to continue to be written, in my view. jon: let me read for you part of the piece that appeared this morning, marvin, in "the new york post" which is owned by the parent corporation of this network. they write: jon: is this, in fact, a bit of a repeat of what we accomplished in world war ii? >> no, it is not a repeat, unfortunately. at the end of world war ii, the u.s. made major efforts, put in an enormous amount of money to help japan and germany change politically, change economically, and both nations did that. in iraq what we are seeing is not the
to be realistic. the young people who are there and who applauded ally will not be shaping foreign policy and we have to deal with the government that exists. it's a coalition government of really intense contradictions and we, therefore, have to be very clear in asserting what we consider to be the vital interests of the united states which are automatically good for israel. because if the united states is healthy and strong and predominant in the region, israel is totally secure. let's not forget, sdentally something very important which the press hasn't played up at all in recent months but yet it is a very telling fact. israel and the united states tend to be almost completely isolated in the middle east. not only in terms of the middle eastern countries but in terms of world opinion. look at the vote in the u.n. when we made every single effort possible to discourage countries from voting in favor of palestinian membership in the u.n. how many votes out of 190, out of 190 did we get? we found only seven countries to support us. this tells us something. and, therefore, we have to be very, ve
is the foreign policy if not the military role of your brand in china in areas like socom. have you noticed that unity, not military, diplomatic, economic activity that both these countries quick >> the short answer is absolutely. to put a little meat on a bone, one of the things i'm supposed to be doing is making sure the united states rants apart archers of latin america. the partnership is a too late thing i you'd agree that it's very one-way now and they very much want the united states in their lives the exception of the two or three or four of them very much want the united states and allies. so we have great trading relationships, great military to military contact, but when you have an organization like the chinese come in the economically powerful, spending money, whether they're increasing infrastructure that pours, panama canal are buying everything that they want and large, large quantities. the partnership with china is very strong. they do the best they can to establish milk to build partnerships and they do pretty well on that. so that's china. on the arabian side, we've seen
politics than with foreign-policy. but there is this session it will never happen, but it could happen. to protect israel in a credible fashion, if we wish, by guarantees which are as binding or or more binding than those we get to the europeans and those to the japanese and south koreans. and this is a country which does not have the opportunity to threaten us directly. at the same time, we should not lose sight that if we do repeat iran, what we did vis-À-vis iraq, we will probably engaged in a conflict that is more protracted and more regionally widespread than was the case with iraq a decade ago? so these are some of the concerns from history. let me make one more observation about the nature of war. toker sees are very able wage total war if they are attacked. they are not so good. they're not read this post. they are mentally not prepared to wage total war if they started they were themselves but were not attacked. difference.ortant we were able to break the will of the germans in large measure by massive air assaults on their civilian population. yes, of course, it was justifie
's foreign policy cognizenti, can't seem to draw the obvious conclusions, stop letting these karzai guys play us as suckers and speed up our exit and stop wasting american lives and dollars. that is not very diplomatic but comes from the former head here and probably, as you probably know what a fair number of people think. is that the right prescription? in other words, he is going beyond something that you're talking about. >> it is pretty close except for some of the rhetoric because i don't think we're wasting lives and dollars there. i think we have had a mission. that mission was to remove of the taliban from control of afghanistan. and it was to try to provide the afghan security forces with the numbers and the capabilities, the skills, that they need to prevent the taliban from taking control again. that mission has, for the most part successful militarily. the part which will help to sustain it which is to have a government in afghanistan which is less corrupt, has not been as successful. but it's, nonetheless i think, going to leave afghanistan and we're not going to totally leave i
and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic setting. >> people for symbolic purposes. >> joe doesn't like paper money either. he wants to get rid of the dollar bill. >> we are into a bartering system at the scarborough house. >> you got a problem saying we should rebrand the party. it's a little whacko. nothing wrong with being a little whacko. >> can you admit your party is a little whacko? >> absolutely! there is extremists on both sides but if you put a bunch of people in a room, can you say that too and they did this weekend. >> left wing activists in a room? so outnumbered. makes me sad. >>> how to turn your child into a better student. dr. david satcher will be here and alexis glick with a report on that. also with us -- ♪ >> i tried to recover here from the way we started but we end the block badly too. also with us is chuck todd and the "the washington post" eugene robinson. up next a look at the top stories and the politico pl playbook. >>> in new england and mid-atlantic, winter forecast a lot of you with a snow day throughout tuesday. isn't so much today
. and he doesn't understand that what that does is create a lack of trust. in foreign policy, the one thing i learned working with george herbert walker bush is that the most important thing in the world is for people to trust america and to have a feeling that america will be there in dealing with the national security issues. on both counts, this president obama has lost. >>steve: it is curious, because if you're just watching -- if you saw the president with netanyahu yesterday, you would think they're getting along great. in the past, for all intents and purposes, it seemed like they hated each other. the fact that b.b. netanyahu used to go to school with mitt romney, that didn't help things. but there is a quote today that apparently a senior israeli official said there was -- quote -- "a tacit agreement apparently between both leaders, if not coordination, to engage in a very intense public display of affection." >>alisyn: good. fantastic. if president obama's visit to israel helps them smooth over the tensions they had in the past and forge some sort of friendship, fantastic. even if
of these things in the world that richard travels in, the foreign policy hands writer establishment there was a great uproar when this came out and i think most people had never seen anything quite like it from a leader in the middle east. >> fair statement. >>> coming up on "morning joe," the rise of the retrowife. why a new group of modern feminists saying having it all really means staying at home? we will discuss this with campbell brown, cosmo's joanna coles and the bbckatty kay. . ♪ for tapping into a wealth of experience. for access to one of the top wealth management firms in the country. for a team of financial professionals who provide customized solutions. for all of your wealth management and retirement goals, discover how pnc wealth management can help you achieve. visit pnc.com/wealthsolutions to find out more. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective slee
right here. >> ticket. -- thank you. since the president is taking his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? >> i'm hoping to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. general that the mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. how owards that direction, did that shift resources away from europe and asia in the 2000's? >> you said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decades. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. the regime was brutal all the time. >> we have the whole world on a table. onhow has our expenditures iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the largest economy. so we manage to remain engaged in other parts of the world. but that does not refer to the proposition that the war iraq was excessively expensive, not only morally but financially and physi
. >> we all no asia is on the rise. he served as singapore's foreign secretary and the dean of the country's school of public policy. he has a new book out "the great convergence, asia, the west and the logic of one world." welcome back. you start the book with good news. since everybody in the united states and the west has been feeling blue, tell us what the good news is with and why we should be happy. >> actually i'm surprised by the kind of level of posseessimism europe and america. the world has never been in better shape if you look at the view. the number was dying in dying in conflicts is the lowest it has ever been. in term of global poverty the only u.n. goal is having more than having by 2015. and the middle class, and this is a really stunning news, if you look at where asia is today, they are 500 million people living in middle-class living standards today in 2013 in asia. by 2020, which is seven years in now, the number will explode from 500 million to 1.75 billion. an increase of 3.5 times in seven years. we've never seen this before in human history. that's going to change
and relatively wealthy russians. about a third of the deposits in cyprus we know are foreign. a large chunk of them are russian. russia didn't get the eurozone into this mess. russia has been there to help. >> cyprus knows having turned to russia for help, it's policy makers who are opposed to higher tax on higher earnings in those banks and it is to some extent an ironic legacy because it was russia's bank failures that made cyprus a part of russians keeping their money in safer places offshore and reinvesting when the appropriate time came and now it's the same crisis in the eurozone which is driving the pendulum back the other way. steve, can you give us a sense of what happens now in moscow? >> well, there's many, many ways that the russians could lose out on this under the current plan. the risk of default. risk of changes to domestic tax rates that we have been alluded to that are attractive for those russian companies in cyprus. in terms of the broader solution, whether it is just the changing of the terms of that 2.5 billion euro loan, an extension, another 5 billion which is sensib
debt, break our dependence on foreign oil and that's in the best interests of a co-- coherent energy policy so many of us are working to develop and certainly in the best interests of our nation's budget. i would encourage my colleagues to take a look at these amendments and should they be brought before us for a vote to join me in support. with that, i thank the president and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: who yields time? mr. grassley: i -- the presiding officer: the senator from iowa is recognized. mr. grassley: okay. mr. president, i -- and colleagues, i rise to speak about amendment 156. i'm offering this amendment to the majority budget to ensure that tax reform is revenue neutral and the money available to do tax reform is not used for spending, as the underlying resolution proposes. i'm pleased to be joined in offering this amendment by a number of my colleagues, senator enzi, leader mcconnell, senator cornyn, the finance ranking member, senator hatch, as well as senator burr, roberts, portman, isakson, thune, coats, and rubio. in order to ensure tax reform does no
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